STEM BEST Expands Opportunities for Students in Rural Communities

By: Tim Felderman, West Delaware High School Principal

West Delaware High School’s DelCo BEST program allows students, in cooperation with community partners, to design a unique learning experience that aligns individual student skills with community and business needs. Students are paired with community partners and businesses through processes reflecting real world employment practices, to provide opportunities for students to develop 21st Century Skills. The Iowa Governor’s STEM Advisory Council selected West Delaware for a STEM BEST grant during the fall of 2016.

Learning beyond the walls of a high school is an objective of West Delaware. West Delaware’s Vision area of Challenging Academics is defined as “educators use effective instructional practices to actively engage students in diverse learning opportunities that require critical thinking and problem solving in real world contexts.” The STEM BEST program and the Iowa Governor’s STEM Advisory Council support of programming which allows students and community partners to develop real-world learning experiences fits the skill sets and dispositions that all students need to be successful in future careers. 

An example of an experience in the DelCo BEST course is students’ recent work with the Good Neighbor Home (GNH) in Manchester. GNH pitched the concept of aesthetic improvements to improve the climate of the building to students. Three students surveyed residents, designed a color palette and decoration scheme, pitched proposals to GNH staff, researched options and prices, and began implementation of the project. Students shared professional skills were developed and ultimately refined in the areas of designed a multi-step project, problem solving, collaboration, implementing a vision, budgeting, and meeting the needs of a diverse audience.

An exciting addition this year is the partnership with the Central Community School District in Elkader. Through this partnership, students from both schools benefit from the resources and talents the schools, staff, and communities provide. The DelCo BEST and ClaytonCo BEST programs are a model of a collaboration between rural schools districts to provide opportunities which otherwise may not be available.

  Read more about STEM BEST Expands Opportunities for Students in Rural Communities

Iowa Meteorologist Finds STEM in the Seasons

There are an incredible number of opportunities for Iowa students interested in STEM careers. From advanced manufacturing to computer science, there are so many diverse fields that fall into science, technology, engineering, math and other related fields.

But STEM is more than just the obvious applications and careers we call to mind easily. STEM is all around us in the world. To demonstrate that, we’re highlighting a STEM career that touches the lives of practically every Iowan: meteorology.

Amber Alexander is a meteorologist in Des Moines, Iowa. Each day, she predicts the weather for Central Iowa at WHO-TV and uses STEM skills to help Iowans prepare for their days. Read on to hear about how she started in meteorology and how STEM brought her into the career field.    

When did you first realize you were interested in meteorology or climatology?

I was 11 years old when I decided I wanted to be a meteorologist. I remember studying meteorology in the sixth grade and thinking about how cool it would be to know the weather on a daily basis. I went home and watched the local broadcast meteorologist that night and decided then that I would pursue that as a career. 

How did your STEM education in elementary and high school influence your decision to pursue a career in meteorology?

I remember really being excited about mathematics in third grade. I enjoyed learning multiplication and division and competing in the times table tests we used to take. I think that likely kick-started my journey to being successful in this field.

Once I discovered meteorology in sixth grade, I explored ways to learn more. I took a course on weather my freshman year of high school, but unfortunately the teacher left before the class started. I was still able to learn a bit more about the field and was still interested in pursuing a career in broadcast meteorology. 

What aspects or areas of STEM are most important in your day-to-day work?

On a day-to-day basis I work a lot with scientific maps and graphs, as well as basic mathematical computations. I'm constantly looking at our weather pattern to determine the temperature and precipitation trend for the week ahead and using the model data to make accurate predictions. 

There are a lot of different STEM specialties involved in tracking and predicting weather. Were there any areas you were surprised to learn are connected to your field of study and career?

The field of meteorology is connected to every single letter of the STEM acronym. What I was most surprised to learn about is the way meteorologists are using technology and engineering to create new equipment meant to study the atmosphere in a way it's never been studied.  

What kind of technology do you use in your day-to-day work activities?

The computer is the only piece of technology we use directly, but we also use data gathered by other sources of technology such as a weather radar, satellite and weather balloon. We rely on that data to forecast and nowcast the weather in order to keep people safe.

What advice do you have for Iowa students interested in meteorology?

If you truly want a career in meteorology, work until you get it. The math and science courses necessary to complete a meteorology degree are tough, but if it's truly your dream, don't quit when you feel discouraged. Consult a professor or assistant for help. They are there to help you. 

What kind of activities can Iowa students do to study meteorology in their own backyards?

Sign up for CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network)! This is a good way to get connected with the meteorology community and learn about how good measurements are taken and used. Also attend a storm spotter training session held by the National Weather Service. Meteorologists rely on good storm spotters during severe weather season.  Read more about Iowa Meteorologist Finds STEM in the Seasons

Iowa Meteorologist Finds STEM in the Seasons

There are an incredible number of opportunities for Iowa students interested in STEM careers. From advanced manufacturing to computer science, there are so many diverse fields that fall into science, technology, engineering, math and other related fields.

But STEM is more than just the obvious applications and careers we call to mind easily. STEM is all around us in the world. To demonstrate that, we’re highlighting a STEM career that touches the lives of practically every Iowan: meteorology.

Amber Alexander is a meteorologist in Des Moines, Iowa. Each day, she predicts the weather for Central Iowa at WHO-TV and uses STEM skills to help Iowans prepare for their days. Read on to hear about how she started in meteorology and how STEM brought her into the career field.    

When did you first realize you were interested in meteorology or climatology?

I was 11 years old when I decided I wanted to be a meteorologist. I remember studying meteorology in the sixth grade and thinking about how cool it would be to know the weather on a daily basis. I went home and watched the local broadcast meteorologist that night and decided then that I would pursue that as a career. 

How did your STEM education in elementary and high school influence your decision to pursue a career in meteorology?

I remember really being excited about mathematics in third grade. I enjoyed learning multiplication and division and competing in the times table tests we used to take. I think that likely kick-started my journey to being successful in this field.

Once I discovered meteorology in sixth grade, I explored ways to learn more. I took a course on weather my freshman year of high school, but unfortunately the teacher left before the class started. I was still able to learn a bit more about the field and was still interested in pursuing a career in broadcast meteorology. 

What aspects or areas of STEM are most important in your day-to-day work?

On a day-to-day basis I work a lot with scientific maps and graphs, as well as basic mathematical computations. I'm constantly looking at our weather pattern to determine the temperature and precipitation trend for the week ahead and using the model data to make accurate predictions. 

There are a lot of different STEM specialties involved in tracking and predicting weather. Were there any areas you were surprised to learn are connected to your field of study and career?

The field of meteorology is connected to every single letter of the STEM acronym. What I was most surprised to learn about is the way meteorologists are using technology and engineering to create new equipment meant to study the atmosphere in a way it's never been studied.  

What kind of technology do you use in your day-to-day work activities?

The computer is the only piece of technology we use directly, but we also use data gathered by other sources of technology such as a weather radar, satellite and weather balloon. We rely on that data to forecast and nowcast the weather in order to keep people safe.

What advice do you have for Iowa students interested in meteorology?

If you truly want a career in meteorology, work until you get it. The math and science courses necessary to complete a meteorology degree are tough, but if it's truly your dream, don't quit when you feel discouraged. Consult a professor or assistant for help. They are there to help you. 

What kind of activities can Iowa students do to study meteorology in their own backyards?

Sign up for CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network)! This is a good way to get connected with the meteorology community and learn about how good measurements are taken and used. Also attend a storm spotter training session held by the National Weather Service. Meteorologists rely on good storm spotters during severe weather season.  Read more about Iowa Meteorologist Finds STEM in the Seasons

Staying Inspired in STEM

By: Camille Sloan Schroeder, Iowa State University College Of Engineering Community Outreach Programs Manager

The Iowa Governor’s STEM Advisory Council recently met and heard from various stakeholders on their thoughts of the future direction of efforts of the initiative as it reflects on the past decade of programming and advocacy. For some, it was their first opportunity to take part with the Council, while others, like me, it’s been an engagement spanning many years. The ongoing struggle of any initiative is how to keep people engaged and inspired in the work so they continue to grow in their efforts to advocate, educate and bring along others to take part. 

Staying inspired in anything can be challenging with the amount of things people are intercepting daily and the multitudes of requests for people’s time, effort and money. It can seem for those that regularly volunteer that it follows as an 80/20 rule. Twenty percent of the population doing 80 percent of the volunteerism with non-profits, boards, committees, in classrooms and after-school programs. Staying inspired rather than exhausted by it all takes work.

See and Celebrate Impact

For me, staying inspired rests on my strong desire to see impact from efforts that can be celebrated. So when I see that 48% of Iowa STEM Scale-Up Program participants are females, it makes me happy to see that involvement and privileged to be a small part helping make that happen. 

Wanting to Make a Difference

Approximately 33% of STEM degrees awarded by Iowa’s 4-year public universities were to females, compared to 20% at Iowa’s 2-year community colleges and 37% at Iowa’s 4-year private colleges and universities in 2017-2018. While we are doing some good things to encourage young women, it pushes me to question how we can do more. That desire to make a difference keeps me interested in how to evolve programming and advocacy on behalf of our future female innovators.

Connecting with Kids

In the end and at the heart of it all for me, it will always come to my why behind the why: What is best for kids? By focusing my volunteerism on one singular question, it helps me maintain focus to stay inspired in how I bequeath myself and my resources to any group or cause. This allows me to connect to youth in a myriad of ways through sitting on a regional STEM Board and getting to see first hand the excitement as a classroom explores a hands-on activity, watching a robotics team learn about failing forward as their trial run with their robot doesn’t quite work and yet they stay undeterred, or seeing the smiling faces of kids having fun in learning as they encounter challenging content with an appetite for more. 

Staying inspired in STEM is realizing that there are countless opportunities for our Iowa youth in STEM, and that each of them need people to give back, help out where they can, and celebrate with them in their learning journey.  Read more about Staying Inspired in STEM

Celebrating Black History Month with Iowa Innovators and Inventors

By: Michelle L. Taylor-Frazier, Founder and Executive Director of Multicultural Educational Programs, Inc.

My name is Michelle Taylor-Frazier. I am the founder of Multicultural Educational Programs, Inc. (MEP). We are celebrating 20 years of inspiring, encouraging, and empowering children in science, technology, engineering and math-STEM. I am honored to write about the Black history in my family in Iowa. I am also honored to have March 16, named by Governor Reynolds as Multicultural Educational Programs Day across the state of Iowa.

MEP has partnered with the Drake University STEM Hub to donate our traveling “From Dreams to Reality” kit with 15 posters of African American Inventors and fun hands activities for the classroom. Please check with the them as place to start to learn more about African American inventors, and then students can continue their studies by utilizing the internet to expand their current knowledge base of African American inventors.

Our history is an important part of American history as the inventions have impacted the everyday lives of so many people across America and around the world in the different areas of medicine, transportation, technology and engineering. However, African Americans inventors were not included in history books so many of the inventions remain unknown to the majority of America. In Iowa specifically, it is still a great challenge to bring diversity into the classroom across the state.

Along this 20-year journey, many frustrating and sometimes outright disrespectful things that have happened to me and our team. I remember once explaining the exhibit and having a high school principal turn beet red and just stand up and leave our presentation while my aunt Sandra Bell, a retired Des Moines school principle and the director of education, was midsentence. It was an experience that could have defined our team and marginalized the exhibit to stay in the Des Moines area. 

The exhibit spent most of the time outside the state of Iowa, where the team experienced so much positivity. About two years later, in 2015, we were contacted by a team at Marshalltown Community College, where the contact person that took us to the previous meeting had been. She said this experience had bothered her to. Their team now had a grant and wanted to develop a Multicultural two-day central tour. The MEP team was thrilled! It took 20 people including the workshop presenters to prepare but as my aunt Sande Bell always says, “Teamwork makes the dream work!”

I have experienced an amazing outreach experience with the Marshalltown Community College and the ISU Extension teams from Hardin County. They wanted to design a two-day multicultural tour of two central Iowa cities. The first day, the tour served 250 high school students. The students were open, however quite shocked to meet Dr. Paula Mahone, who delivered the first living Septuplets right here in Des Moines. They also met my older cousin Donald Pipkins, a retired NASA engineer from Houston, TX. He has won many awards for his work and was one of the leads for the space shuttle team that designed the star tracking system. 

The hardest part was that the students were so shocked that African American people invented things or led 60 people on a medical team to deliver seven babies successfully. Our team further enhanced the multicultural experience by inviting two amazing professors who are also Hispanic as quest speakers. Dr. Laura Redon, a professor at the University of Texas, San Antonio and Dr. Richard Salas the Director of Multicultural Affairs at Des Moines University-DMU. Each spoke about their challenges growing up in Texas. Laura shared about her current research and book showing how Hispanic students, despite their challenges, were performing well in college with the correct team of support. Dr. Salas shared about working in the agricultural fields with his family. 

On the final day, word had traveled around about the wonderful experiences the youth had. 800 high school youth were signed up, however more than 1100 showed up! 

Where did I get my explosive and positive inspiration and creativity? Being the daughter of an engineer and inventor who worked for the US Army as an officer lent me an extraordinary life as an African American child in the 1960-1970’s. I grew up around the world. I lived daily in a family where the statement “why not?” was the norm or “nothing beats a failure but a try!” However, the story of my Father LTC. Grady E. Taylor is a fascinating story for another day, when the book that I have written comes out. Read more about Celebrating Black History Month with Iowa Innovators and Inventors

Iowa Kidventor Helps Make STEM a Hot Topic

Earlier this year, Charles Smith of Ottumwa, Iowa, appeared on Good Morning America with his award-winning invention, the Benge Beacon. The device, created to help firefighters keep track of exit points in burning buildings, brought more than just Charles’ dedication to and passion for inventing to the national stage. It also showcased the importance of a STEM education and the potential future opportunities for Iowa students.

Charles started his inventing process with his parents for the local invention convention. Susan Smith, his mom, shared the process with the Iowa Governor’s STEM Advisory Council. After being selected as part of the top five inventors in his local convention, Charles applied for the state level. At the Invent Iowa Invention Convention, Charles placed third overall for kids between kindergarten and fifth grade. That sent him to the national competition. There, he placed first in the kindergarten division—and eventually made his way to the Good Morning America stage.

While Charles explored the world of inventing and STEM, Susan was there every step of the way. Her story, as the parent of a kidventor, has lessons for every parent hoping to inspire a love of STEM in their own children. 

Tip One: Start with Your Child’s Interests

Charles created the Benge Beacon to help firefighters stay safe in very unsafe conditions. He’s always been interested in firefighting, so it was a natural fit for him. On encouraging Charles through the process, Susan said, “It was pretty easy, actually, because he was excited about the project. Because he’s loved fire stuff since he was one. It made it his project, not ours.”

Tip Two: Get Creative with Everyday Activities 

STEM is all around us in the world. From baking to budgeting and beyond, there are nearly endless opportunities to study STEM in everyday life. Susan and her family try to incorporate it in different ways. Charles recalled one experiment where they tested the difference in volume between two glasses. He was surprised by the results—the shorter, wider glass actually held more water. It was simple, but it stuck with him.

“It doesn’t have to be a time you set aside and say, ‘Okay, we’re going to do a science experiment.’ You can look at everyday activities you already do and utilize those,” Susan said. “It doesn’t have to be an official STEM experiment to help families learn.”

Tip Three: Turn to Your School for Resources

The STEM skills Charles learned in school helped him create his original invention. Right now, his class is learning about nature and building a terrarium. But there’s so much more to it than that.

“He’s got an amazing school. He does have some enrichment classes they pull him out for, but the entire school is great,” said Susan. “We love it. They’re giving him a great education.”

At his school—and schools across the state—students have access to STEM Scale-Up Programs offered by the Iowa Governor’s STEM Advisory Council. These programs are designed to help students build their interest in STEM and they range from teaching robotics to concentrating on the basics of a STEM education. 

When you or your child are interested in learning more about the opportunities to engage with STEM, turn to your school to see what is offered. 

With his STEM education, curiosity and passion for inventing, it’s clear that Charles has a bright future. But he has one little tip of his own for helping kids get involved in STEM: “Make it fun!” Read more about Iowa Kidventor Helps Make STEM a Hot Topic

Bridging the Skills Gap by Linking Business and Education

By: Chad Janzen, Rock Valley Community School District

Iowa’s businesses, particularly manufacturing, are finding employees in short supply. In addition to the lack of employees, businesses are also finding hires lacking in the necessary skills. According to the 2018 Workforce Needs Survey, 56% of applicants lack the necessary qualifications. The skills gap is alarming considering 53% of the skills gap is related to middle-skill jobs (2018 Occupational Employments Statistics).

To meet the growing needs of its own community, Rock Valley Community School District was awarded a STEM BEST Grant in 2014. The district used these funds to build Rocket Manufacturing, a fully-functioning, self-sustaining, student-run manufacturing business.  Students work and learn in a collaborative environment performing a variety of jobs. These jobs include marketing, accounting, using architectural software to design parts per customers’ specifications, and building parts employing automated machines such as a CNC mill and lathe, plasma tables and welders.

Students also develop the 21st Century and employability skills employers seek such as creativity, critical thinking, flexibility, accountability. Communication skills are developed through written, electronic and oral communication for students who work on the business side of the program. Students must be creative and flexible when working with business finances. Accountability skills are developed quickly when meeting deadlines in the real world.

The success of Rocket Manufacturing could not have been accomplished without the help of business partnerships.  Here are some of the keys to building essential school-business partnerships:

  • Focus on how you can help businesses rather than on how they can help you.
  • Find a business partner or two to be your cheerleader.
  • Financial assistance may be needed, but discuss that last.
  • Utilize your city and local economic development corporation.

Visit the Rocket Manufacturing Website at www.rocketmanufacturing.weebly.com. Click on the media link to hear specific information and success stories about the program. More information can be found on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/rocketmfg/. Read more about Bridging the Skills Gap by Linking Business and Education

What the I.O.W.A. STEM Teacher Award Brings to a Classroom

Q&A with Ann Gritzner

 

Earlier this year, the 2019 I.O.W.A STEM Teacher Award recipients were announced. These six outstanding educators represent different parts of the state, but they all share an infectious passion for teaching STEM. Their work inspires their students to explore science, technology, engineering and math all while preparing them for some of the most in-demand jobs in Iowa’s future workforce. 

Ann Gritnzer, science teacher and Project Based Learning leader at Central Community School District in Elkader, was one of the six teachers recognized in 2019. With the award comes $1,500 for each teacher’s classroom, along with another $1,500 for personal use. What can that award do for a classroom? Turns out, quite a lot. 

What was the first thing you bought for your classroom with your award?

In October, I moved into a brand-new, remodeled classroom. Because of that, my classroom needs were small, but this gives my students a chance to look at our wish list instead. There have been several improvements suggested for our compost project, like magnetic silverware catch for the compost collection and condiment pumps to reduce plastic waste. Other students are looking into a classroom beehive.

We did spend a little money on rebar,a steel reinforcing rod in concrete and lumber to pour a concrete pad for our compost pile. The concrete was covered by a S.W.A.P. Grant from the Iowa DNR, but we needed some additional materials not covered in the grant.

The best is yet to come! 

What impact do you feel like this award will have on your classroom and students?

As a teacher, it’s always amazing to be recognized for what we do every day. To be nominated by a parent and to have so many former students and community members come support me was very gratifying.  

I think this award increased my excitement for teaching and hopefully, students will feed off my increased energy. I think it has also changed the perception of STEM education in my district. I think we will see an increase in resources for STEM education from both schools and community.

What advice do you have for teachers who are nominated and will be applying for the teacher award this year?

The application process is worth the effort. Not only in the reflection on your teaching experience but also just the honor of knowing someone sees what you pour your heart and soul into every day. Winning this award is a career-altering experience and you should not miss the opportunity! 

 

Do you know a teacher like Ann? 

Nominate him or her today for the 2020 I.O.W.A STEM Teacher Award presented by Kemin Industries.This award recognizes one teacher from each of the STEM regions across Iowa for their dedication to STEM. Their efforts are helping increase interest and achievement in science, technology, engineering and math across the state and preparing our students for the future workforce.

  Read more about What the I.O.W.A. STEM Teacher Award Brings to a Classroom

STEM Teacher Externship Classroom Application

By: Nate Lahr

As a STEM Teacher Extern at Collins Aerospace in Manchester, my main project involves analyzing how a department operates and to look for a better flow of the work to increase productivity. I work primarily with two teams. Each of these teams have three stations and each station can handle most of the work that comes to the team, but there is certain work that can only be done on one of the stations and other work that can only be done on another of the stations. My goal is to put together a plan that allows for the work to flow more efficiently through this department with the equipment and operators that are available.

As a math teacher, the content I teach may be important for some students, but for the majority of my students it is more valuable to try and create a self-assessing learner through the content. The common question of “where am I going to use this?” pops in my mind a lot. With some, math content it is not suitable to be taught at a transfer level in the class. I have come to the realization that this is okay, not everything should be taught at the high of level. So in those instances, I have tried to reinforce the idea of becoming a stronger learner; using grit, problem solving skills, being reflective and using a multitude of other skills that could be used in any context.

I have seen and discussed with some production managers the value of finding those employees who are willing and wanting to learn. I have already gathered a few more success stories of employees like this who were on the floor last year and have now moved up to a new role such as engineer, quality inspector or engineering tech. These are valuable to me to try and reach students who are not interested in pursuing a four year degree, and help them see how far becoming a strong learner could help them open some new doors in the future. I can't wait to build on some of the things I implemented in my classes last year as I gain more insight through this placement this summer.

  Read more about STEM Teacher Externship Classroom Application

What It Means To Be A Woman In Tech

By: Kawther Rouabhi

It seems like I’ve gone through the routine a million times before: shaking an adult’s hand, exchanging names and almost immediately thereafter, what my major is, also known as the single personality trait of a twenty-first century college student. “Computer Science and Engineering… Oh, wow. I could never do that. I admire that,” they’d likely say. If they’re not an engineer, they’re probably thinking one of two things: hardand boring.

Women in the United States earn 57 percent of all undergraduate degrees, but only 18 percent of computer and information sciences degrees. When people hear statistics like these, they often question why girls are not interested in computer science. The way I see it, we should be questioning what we’re telling girls about what it takes to be successful in a STEM career. Once the next generation of young women knows what it means to be a woman in tech, we will see fewer unbalanced statistics. Here are what I believe to be the three most important to a career in tech:

1. Challenge yourself: It’s better than others challenging you.

It’s as inevitable as death and taxes. People are going to challenge you throughout your life and career whether you like it or not, and you’re definitely not going to like it if you haven’t challenged yourself. A woman in tech knows that going the extra mile always pays off. It is not selfish of her to want success. She does the work to receive the reward she deserves. She keeps in mind whyshe’s doing it and gives herself a specific reason to succeed. A woman in tech fails because that is what happens when you challenge yourself. She recognizes that learning as much as she can wouldn’t be possible without failing a few times along the way. She works hard, and she might fail. So, she works harder. Eventually, she will succeed.

2. Engineering is collaborative: Build your team.

If we are to inspire the next generation of female software engineers, we need to debunk the myth of competitiveness in the tech industry. Nobody pursuing a STEM career, no matter who they are or where they come from, should ever feel like they are the only one looking out for themselves. Being a woman in tech means building a strong network of supporters. Her team is diverse, with men and women of all colors and backgrounds and all interests. She and her teammates make mistakes together and learn from each other through collaboration. A woman in tech celebrates the successes of her teammates because it doesn’t make her less successful. She is grateful to her team for their respect and support, and she expresses her gratitude. 

3. Find a problem. Solve a problem.

No matter what a little girl wants to be when she grows up, we should encourage her to be a problem solver. Learning how to efficiently solve problems might be the most useful skill a person can have. A woman in tech solves problems big and small. The twenty-first century is far from perfect. Every aspect of our society is flawed in some way. But the goal of my generation and those to come should be to make our world more perfect; as perfect as it can be. A woman in tech serves. She thinks not only of what a career in tech can do for her, but what skills she can use to make an impact on her community, country and world. Once she finds what her passion is, a woman in tech thinks about what she can do to make it better for others. Just like a journalist’s big story consumes them and they hunt down every last detail to tell it right, a woman in tech finds her story, her muse. She thinks, “if I was given a mission to help a group of people, I would help people affected by…” A woman in tech lives to make change. When she solves the problem, she pulls all the stops to make her creation not only achieve but perform betterthan anything before.

Now is the time that we change the course of history and innovation, and to do so means prioritizing representation and inclusion of all people in the workplace. When I look at my generation, I see people that care about every issue imaginable. I see doers, encouraging young people to make their passions one with their career leading to more prosperous futures. I am proud to work with the Iowa Governor’s STEM Advisory Council to show students across Iowa what they are capable of when they are problem solvers.

To learn more about how the Council is advancing STEM across Iowa, visit https://www.iowastem.gov.

*Statistics provided by National Center for Women & Information Technology Read more about What It Means To Be A Woman In Tech

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